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Car Safety Features are Necessary for Inexperienced Drivers

  • 17
  • August
    2011

The leading cause of death for American teenagers is car accidents. Roughly two-thirds of fatal teen accidents involve driver error. While newly licensed teens on the road are more likely to be involved in a car accident, there are safety measures parents can take to prevent or reduce the severity of a car crash, should one occur.

Choosing the right vehicle for a new driver can be difficult. Crash test experts recommend mid-size sedans for teenagers because they are easier to control and are large enough to support the impact of a motor vehicle accident. For those who prefer trucks, smaller ones are preferable as they are easier to drive. Large trucks and SUVs are not recommended for teens because they are more prone to roll-overs and they are harder to control.

Truck Crashworthiness: Truckers Also Deserve Safety Protection

  • 03
  • August
    2011

A major advocacy group for American truckers recently called on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to do more to improve commercial vehicle safety. Semi tractors are not subject to the same crashworthiness standards applied to light trucks and automobiles, and other basic protections that other motorists take for granted are not standard equipment in all commercial trucks.

Study Results Show Mistreatment of LGBT Patients in Long-term Study Results Show Mistreatment of LGBT Patients in Long-term Care

  • 21
  • July
    2011

The unsettling results of a recent online survey have prompted concerns about long-term patient care of the LGBT community. The survey asked for insight on older LGBT residents' experiences within the long-term care system. The results indicate that there is much work to be done before the needs of these patients will be properly met.

Cyclists, Avoid Common Accidents This Summer

  • 08
  • July
    2011

As gas prices climb, more people looking for ways to go green are embracing cycling as a sustainable way to travel. As the number of cyclists increases, however, so does the number of bicycle accidents. 51,000 cyclists in the United States were injured in 2009, up from 43,000 two years earlier. Fortunately, basic safety guidelines can help new and experienced cyclists alike avoid most kinds of accidents.

The majority of collisions between motorists and cyclists occur when a car pulls out of an intersection into the path of a bicycle. The vehicle either hits the side of the bike or stops suddenly so the bicycle hits the driver's side of the car. By using a horn or a bell, or even yelling, when you see a car at an intersection ahead, you will grab the motorists' attention. In addition, biking slowly across intersections can give you ample time to stop if necessary.

Truck Accident Prevention Update: Changes to Driver Hours Coming

  • 13
  • June
    2011

Truck accidents often result from the deadly combination of driver fatigue and tens of thousands of pounds of cargo moving at highway speeds. Because truck drivers, other motorists and passengers are extremely vulnerable to traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and broken bones when involved in collisions with semis, federal laws closely regulate the working hours of interstate truckers.

Bus Regulation: 'Profits Over Safety'?

  • 12
  • April
    2011

The former chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board has spoken out about the three recent bus crashes in the New York area, at least one of which was probably due to driver fatigue and poor work conditions, given the fact that these were single-bus accidents involving no other vehicles. The buses apparently just went off the road.

As reported by WNYC, former chairman James Hall said, "They [industry and government] have treated the people who ride these buses as second-class citizens and given them second class safety." Hall was referring to a lack of "commitment" in efforts to prevent bus accidents - particularly those bus accidents involving budget operators.

Two Recent Bus Crashes Leave People Seriously Injured or Killed

  • 16
  • March
    2011

Two recent accidents call to mind possible driver fatigue caused by unsafe work conditions.

The first bus accident happened over the March 12 weekend and killed 15 people. The second bus accident happened just after the first, and this one killed two people. Scores of passengers were injured. In both accidents, it appears as though bus driver negligence (or bus company negligence) was the likely culprit, as both accidents appear to have involved only the buses and no other vehicles.

Points on Your Driver's License for Talking and Driving

  • 16
  • February
    2011

It used to be that in the state of New York you got a traffic ticket and a $100 fine for talking on a handheld mobile phone and driving at the same time. Doing just that has been against New York law for years, but the law had no teeth. So many drivers did it anyway, in large part because the punishment was so slight. Now there's been a change to the law: the addition of two points on your driver's license as punishment for the traffic offense. The law is an effort to cut down on distracted driving that, according to CBS News, causes one-fifth of all car accidents in New York.

Guilty Plea in New York Crash

  • 21
  • January
    2011

High-traffic areas can lead to high accident rates for vehicles and pedestrians. Improving safety conditions within these regions is a point of emphasis when designing or changing roadways. The accidents that happen underscore why drivers may avoid specific routes. Many highways go through many various cities, forcing more and more vehicles into places that are unaccustomed to the volume of traffic. When auto accidents happen, officials want to understand why, so they can better prevent them in the future.

A New York woman recently pleaded guilty to an accident she caused this past July. Sybil Monk was traveling on Route 5 in Montgomery County when she had a head-on collision with two motorcyclists. The accident killed one and injured three others. Monk was charged with DWI after it was discovered that she was under the influence of prescribed narcotics at the time of the crash.

Nursing Home Possible for Injured 33-Year-Old

  • 10
  • December
    2010

At age 23 and pregnant Michelle Fridley narrowly missed a buggy in upstate New York and hit a tree instead. As a result of the auto accident and spinal cord injury, Fridley became a quadriplegic. Fridley is an example of one of the many young people who have been seriously injured or disabled, requiring substantial medical care -- care that could be given at home -- but instead face being forced into nursing homes.